War hero Nora will never be forgotten

David Griffiths - Brought in an article to go with story about Private Nora Caveney (clipping scanned also)
Colin Drury story

David Griffiths - Brought in an article to go with story about Private Nora Caveney (clipping scanned also) Colin Drury story

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A Walsden girl who became the first female soldier to be killed during combat in World War Two is to be remembered with two information plaques on the site where she died.

Brave Nora Caveney was just 18 when she perished at the hands of German bombers on April 17, 1942.

She was serving with the Anti-Aircraft Command in Southampton at the time, operating the specialist Predictor computers which monitored enemy planes approaching Britain so gunners across the country could be alerted.

Now the site in Southampton where Nora met her tragic end will be marked with two information boards, ensuring the young war hero will never be forgotten.

The campaign was spearheaded by author Paul Keast, who lives in the south coast city.

He is currently working on a book about World War Two and Nora’s name came up in his research.

Mr Keast said: “A friend, Mike Parker of the Royal Air Force Association, and I dug a bit deeper into her story.

“We both felt strongly that Nora’s story should be recorded and remembered

“We approached Hampshire County Council, which shared our enthusiasm and it arranged for the information boards to be produced.”

It’s thought the teenager, who would almost certainly have lied about her age to have been accepted into the 148th (Mixed) Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, would have been one of the first women in the post.

It was only opened up to female recruits part way through the Second World War.

Private Caveney is buried at Netley Military Cemetery in Southampton.

The information boards will ensure Nora will never be forogtten. They will be unveiled at a ceremony on the site of her death on October 12.