VIDEO: Floods in West Yorkshire after heavy rain

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A number of flood alerts and warnings remain in place in West Yorkshire as the region was hit by torrential rain.

Heavy rainfall caused rivers to overflow, drains to back up and traffic delays on many of the region’s roads.

Flooding in Market Street, Hebden Bridge this evening.

Flooding in Market Street, Hebden Bridge this evening.

A flood alert for the River Calder and its tributaries from Todmorden to Brighouse was issued by the Environment Agency on Saturday.

And they sounded the flood sirens at Todmorden and Mytholmroyd amid concern over the rising River Calder.

The river at Hebden Bridge broke its bank on Saturday evening causing flooding on the roads.

West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service received around 100 calls during Saturday evening, with 62 being related to flooding.

A spokesman said: “Most of the flood related incidents were to external or internal flooding, but attendances were also made to 15 incidents were persons were stuck in vehicles in floodwater and one incident to a person stuck in a property due to rising floodwaters.”

Firefighters rescued 15 people from areas of rising floodwaters.

Barnsdale Road in Allerton Bywater was also closed on Saturday evening due to flooding.

Four flood warnings on the River Calder remain in place on Sunday, stretching from Todmorden to Horbury, Brighouse, Mirfield and Ravensthorpe.

A Environment Agency spokesman said: “River levels on the River Calder have just peaked (1am) and are now falling.

“They will continue to fall through Sunday. No further rainfall is forecast for Sunday. We will continue to monitor the situation.”

Other areas affected by flooding were Copley, Otley, Leeds and Bradford.

The Met Office has issued a yellow ‘be aware’ warning for ice across West Yorkshire.

It warned people to take extra care when walking, driving or cycling in the affected area.

The Met Office spokesman said: “As rain, sleet and snow clear eastwards, temperatures will fall sharply under clearing skies and will allow widespread icy stretches to form on untreated roads and pavements. Freezing fog patches may be another local hazard.”