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Nine out of 10 cops ‘don’t trust bosses’

West Yorkshire acting chief constable Dee Collins

West Yorkshire acting chief constable Dee Collins

Only one in ten of the staff and officers at West Yorkshire Police trust their senior managers, according to a damning report.

The review carried out by consultants t-three for the force, which is currently undergoing a radical shake-up in the face of Government funding cuts, revealed that recent changes have taken a dramatic toll on morale.

It is transforming the way it does business while making more than £100 million in cuts over four years and seeing officer numbers drop below 5,000.

A poll of staff revealed 56 per cent had a negative view of the force, which was described as a “low-trust organisation”, and would not recommend it as an employer.

Sixty-two per cent of staff cent said they did not trust their leaders and only 10.5 per cent said they did.

One member of staff said: “In 38 years of working for this force I have never known staff be treated as shabbily or morale so low.”

But the report said the force’s performance in tackling crime had improved recently, showing “the strong leadership and high levels of commitment and resolve”.

Temporary chief constable Dee Collins said the force wanted an “independent assessment of just how our people felt, however painful the results, in order that we could do something about it”.

She said the force was not unique in how staff felt and added: “I and my senior colleagues have now begun a programme of work to look at how we can tackle the issues raised, to further improve West Yorkshire Police, make it a better place to work and in turn provide an even better service to the public.”

Nick Smart of the Police Federation, which represents rank and file officers, said his members faced external pressures such as extra hours and negativity in the media “before they even walk through the door”.

 

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